Course Descriptions

PHYS117. Physical Science Lab

This laboratory course illustrates the scientific method through a series of experiments into physical phenomena. As a companion course to PHYS 137 Physical Science, it provides students an opportunity to view science as a process and not just a body of knowledge. This course also provides prospective teachers with a model for the methods and materials of teaching science. This course fulfills the laboratory requirement for certification in Elementary Education (P-5). One and a half laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: PHYS 137 recommended, but not required. Credit, 1 hour. Offered fall and spring semesters.



PHYS137. Physical Science

This introductory course integrates physics, chemistry, and earth sciences to emphasize general principles and their application to real-world situations. As the magnificent order of the physical world is demonstrated, the scientific method is highlighted as a powerful means to discover knowledge that can help us understand and shape our world. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite: None. Credit, 3 hours. Offered fall and spring semesters.



PHYS140. Astronomy

This introductory course investigates the observations and theories of astronomy. The success of the scientific method is demonstrated through the logical application of the laws of science to construct an understanding of our universe. A descriptive study of our solar system and Milky Way galaxy is highlighted by observation sessions. Three lectures and one and a half laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: None. Credit, 4 hours. Offered fall and spring semesters.



PHYS241. Physics I

This algebra-based, introductory course investigates physical phenomena primarily associated with motion, forces, momentum, energy, waves, and thermodynamics. Specific topics are chosen that emphasize the interests of students from physics, chemistry, engineering, medicine, and related fields. Problem solving and the scientific method are stressed throughout the course. Three lectures and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: grade of C or better in MATH 132, MATH 136, or a calculus course. Credit, 4 hours. Offered fall and spring semesters.



PHYS242. Physics II

This algebra-based, introductory course (a continuation of PHYS 241 Physics I) investigates physical phenomena primarily associated with electricity, magnetism, optics, and quantum physics. Specific topics are chosen that emphasize the interests of students from physics, chemistry, engineering, medicine, and related fields. Problem solving and the scientific method are stressed throughout the course. Three lectures and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: grade of C or better in PHYS 241. Credit, 4 hours. Offered fall and spring semesters.



PHYS332. Experimental Physics

This laboratory course provides an experimental component to the undergraduate physics curriculum. Emphasis is placed on experiment design, error analysis, model evaluation, and professional presentations. Six laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: grades of C or better in PHYS 242 and MATH 240. Credit, 3 hours. Offered spring semester of odd years.



PHYS335. Quantum Physics

This calculus-based, intermediate course provides a thorough quantitative understanding of physical phenomena associated with quantum theory. Specific topics include light quanta (photons), matter waves, the Schrödinger equation, the Bohr theory, and hydrogenic atoms. An introduction to relativity is also included. Prerequisites: grades of C or better in PHYS 242 and MATH 241. Credit, 3 hours. Offered fall semester.



PHYS410. Science & Society

This seminar course investigates the effect of scientific developments on society, religion, technology, and the environment; the role of science in the history of mankind; and the relationships between the sciences. Society’s perception of scientists and the resulting impact on the development of ideas and support of research are discussed. May be repeated for up to three hours credit. Prerequisite: Junior or senior with a major or minor in biology, chemistry, mathematics, or physics. Credit, 1 hour. Offered fall semester.



PHYS430. Classical Mechanics

This traditional course considers the basic experimental laws of mechanics as stated by Sir Isaac Newton and the development of the mathematical formalism that describes these laws. Specific topics include motion of a particle in one dimension, harmonic oscillation, motion in three dimensions, a noninertial reference system, and a central force field. A brief introduction of Lagrangian mechanics is included. Prerequisites: grades of C or better in PHYS 330 and MATH 241. Credit, 3 hours. Offered fall semester of odd years.



PHYS431. Electromagnetism

This traditional course develops the mathematical formalism of Maxwell’s equations from basic experimental laws of electricity and magnetism. Specific topics include the electrostatics of conductors and dielectrics, energy considerations electrodynamics electromagnetism, and magnetism. Prerequisites: grades of C or better in PHYS 330 and MATH 241. Credit, 3 hours. Offered fall semester of even years.



Pages